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Last night was the kind of evening when most people want to curl up under a blanket watch the latest episode of 106 & Park or 30 Rock. With temperatures in the lower teens, I wondered how many of the new Radio Rookies would make the 1.5 hour trek from their neighborhood down to Soho to visit WNYC Radio for the first time.

Those new Bronx Rookies showed me--all 7 made the trip! While at the station the Rookies listened to Rookie graduate Keith’s Valentine's Day story, had a chance to sit in Leonard Lopate’s studio and get the behind the microphone, and a Daily News reporter interviewed them for an article.

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    As far as destination music festivals go, Governors Ball is an odd duck. Where Coachella and Bonnaroo have become behemoths of camping and partying all night, Gov Ball feels smaller in scope -- in part, because music ends promptly at 11 p.m. and everyone leaves for the night; and in part because the layout make everything feel a little less sprawling. Don't get me wrong, that frequent hike to and from the Honda or the Big Apple stages to the main GovBallNYC Stage will wear you out, especially when navigating through obstacles (maybe with, for instance, a bunch of camera gear). But it's manageable.

    On the other hand, Governors Ball may be at a popularity tipping point: During the weekend's biggest, and therefore most-crowded sets (Drake, Lana Del Rey, Tame Impala, The Black Keys, among them) that same relatively compact confines creates bottlenecks that made it incredibly difficult to navigate through the dense hordes of concert-goers, or just people standing around day-drinking, standing in long lines, or just chilling (passed out?) in the grass. Every festival has this, of course, but footpath flow could be rethought. Similarly, there was the inevitable sound bleed from stage-to-stage -- something Ryan Adams (half-jokingly?) addressed during his Saturday night set, which was scheduled opposite the thundering bass and beats of Deadmau5.

    Governors Ball is clearly getting bigger every year, but it may need to find a better sweet spot to accommodate its fans. 

    All that said, Governors Ball provided more than enough of top music highlights to overcome logistics. Besides Drake's star-power on Friday night, Florence And The Machine and St. Vincent were the true favorites, each demonstrating exceptional nuance and grace amid their powerful songs -- especially as Annie Clark matched her gnarled, noisy melodies with subtle robotic choreography.

    St. Vincent's Annie Clark performs on the Big Apple Stage at Governors Ball on Randall's Island in New York on June 5, 2015.

    And My Morning Jacket, after a long hiatus, returned with a set that mixed newer songs and nostalgic classics -- including the soaring "Wordless Chorus" from 2005's Z.

    My Morning Jacket's Jim James performs on the Honda Stage at Governors Ball on Randall's Island in New York on June 5, 2015.

    Saturday seemed low key in comparison: While the early morning rain created a slurry of mud in the grassy fields, it thankfully never descended into full-Woodstock '94 madness. The day brought loud rock from White Lung and J. Roddy Walton & The Business, and also calmer moments from Sharon Van Etten, Conor Oberst, and even Bjork -- who brought out a brand new ornate costume and entire chamber orchestra to deliver live arrangements of her otherworldly hits and melancholy songs from Vulnicura, all synced to inventive animations, music videos and even fireworks. While a giant festival may not be the most ideal place to hear music that delicate and open-hearted and quiet, it was stunning to see so many turn out at the big stage to catch a glimpse of an icon -- even if from afar.

    Bjork performs on the GovBallNYC stage at Governors Ball on Randall's Island in New York on June 6, 2015.

    Then, the party really got going, with EDM from SBTRKT, hip-hop from Flume and Atmosphere, and Future Islands doing its synth pop thing to a tent full of aspiring magnificently awkward dancers. And then, if you weren't into the grinding wub-wubs and deep drops of Deadmau5, Ryan Adams rolled through a career-spanning set -- from the alt-country rockers of Heartbreaker and last year's self-titled record to Cold Roses' winding Grateful Dead jams -- on a stage adorned with vintage arcade game consoles and an old Dr. Pepper vending machine. 

    Sunday picked up again, with Sturgill Simpson crooning country songs, Flying Lotus melting your mind with dark and jazz-inflected electronic tapestries, and Hot Chip getting the crowd moving with buoyant electronic pop jams. The other clear favorites were The War On Drugs' guitar anthems, and Tame Impala' tripped-out riffs for maybe its largest crowd yet.

    Another big highlight was the venerable comedy legend "Weird Al" Yankovic, who delivered a phenomenal and smile-inducing performance of his parody songs -- both from last year's Billboard No. 1 album, Mandatory Fun, and jam-packed medleys of older hits like "White & Nerdy" and "Fat," for which he gamely adorned that hefty suit and makeup from his old video. Needless to say, me at ages 8, 13, 20, and, now 30-something me were kinda geeking out simultaneously.

    'Weird Al' Yankovic performs in the Gotham tent stage at Governors Ball on Randall's Island in New York on June 7, 2015.

    And to close things out was The Black Keys, doing what The Black Keys do best; simply put: rock.

    The Black Keys' Dan Auerbach performs on the GovBallNYC stage on Randall's Island in New York on June 7, 2015.

    While there were a few decent surprises and discoveries along the way, Governors Ball is made for these sort of big tentpole moments. And for that, it completely succeeded. Festivals can be a pain at times, sure, but Governors Ball, like many other big fests, exudes this odd summer camp feeling: When it's over, you're totally ready to go home, but still a little bummed to return to reality. I guess there's always next year.


    The Decemberists' Colin Meloy performs on the Honda Stage at Governors Ball on Randall's Island in New York on June 5, 2015.

     

    St. Vincent's Annie Clark performs on the Big Apple Stage at Governors Ball on Randall's Island in New York on June 5, 2015.

      

    My Morning Jacket's Jim James performs on the Honda Stage at Governors Ball on Randall's Island in New York on June 5, 2015.

     

    Already taking a nap on the first day of Governors Ball.

     

    Festival goers playing cornhole early on Saturday afternoon at Governors Ball.

     

    White Lung's Mish Way performs on the Honda Stage at Governors Ball on Randall's Island in New York on June 6, 2015.

     

    J. Roddy Walton   The Business performs on the Big Apple Stage at Governors Ball on Randall's Island in New York on June 6, 2015.

     

    Fans wave and sing along to J. Roddy Walton   The Business at Governors Ball.

     

    Marina And The Diamonds performs on the GovBallNYC stage at Governors Ball on Randall's Island in New York on June 6, 2015.

     

    Sharon Van Etten performs on the Big Apple Stage at Governors Ball on Randall's Island in New York on June 6, 2015.

     

    Little Dragon performs on the GovBallNYC stage at Governors Ball on Randall's Island in New York on June 6, 2015.

     

    More napping on Saturday afternoon at Governors Ball.

     

    Future Islands performs in the Gotham tent at Governors Ball on Randall's Island in New York on June 6, 2015.

     

    Fireworks from afar during Bjork's set at the GovBallNYC stage at Governors Ball.

     

    Ryan Adams performs on the Honda Stage at Governors Ball on Randall's Island in New York on June 5, 2015.

     

    Sturgill Simpson performs on the GovBallNYC stage at Governors Ball on June 7, 2015.

     

    Tame Impala performs on the GovBallNYC stage at Governors Ball on Randall's Island in New York on June 7, 2015.

     

    'Weird Al' Yankovic performs in the Gotham tent at Governors Ball on Randall's Island in New York on June 7, 2015.

     

    Hot Chip performs on the Big Apple stage at Governors Ball on Randall's Island in New York on June 7, 2015.

     

    The Black Keys' Dan Auerbach performs on the GovBallNYC stage on Randall's Island in New York on June 7, 2015.

     

    The Black Keys' Patrick Carney performs on the GovBallNYC stage on Randall's Island in New York on June 7, 2015.

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    All summer, WQXR has been bringing you live broadcasts from the Naumburg Bandshell in Central Park where we've also been asking you to share your photos using #WQXRsummer. Here are 10 snapshots from the bandshell that prove nothing beats a classical music concert in the park.

    And tune in at 7:30 pm on Tuesday, Aug. 4, for our last Naumburg broadcast of the summer featuring the East Coast Chamber Orchestra.

    Colin Jacobsen of The Knights says that despite thunderstorms and high humidity, the show must go on!

    And when thunderstorms made the audience move under the Bethesda Terrace, members of The Knights went with them.

    A photo posted by passionfornyc (@passionfornyc) on

    Really, nothing stops classical music fans.

    A photo posted by Julia C (@jules_8611) on

    That post-storm sky, though.

    A photo posted by Eli Goldberg (@ekg123esq) on

    A packed park for Ensemble LPR and pianist Simone Dinnerstein.

    A photo posted by Music Richie (@musicrichie) on

    This happy pooch knows what's up.

    A photo posted by Cathy Huber (@one.eyed.kerry) on

    Best excuse for multitasking.

    A photo posted by Chante (@harlempurls) on

    It doesn't get much more perfect than this.

    A photo posted by Julia C (@jules_8611) on

    Did we mention that nothing stops classical music fans?

    A photo posted by @sbaraboo on

    A good night, indeed.

    You can follow WQXR on Instagram at @wqxr_classical and see all the #WQXRsummer photos here.


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    When you see an image of smiling people on an ad or a website, there's a pretty good chance it's a stock photo — a generic picture of some situation, like "Woman Laughing Alone with Salad." There are easily millions of stock photos online for download, usually for a price. But the WNYC Data News Team is adding a few more: photos illustrating quintessential NYC situations. They're free, licensed for non-commercial and editorial use and also available on Flickr.

     


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    A few months ago, we sent out a survey on a topic that appears to be the bane of many listeners' existence: digital clutter. Over one third of respondents told us that the thing that drives them MOST crazy – the biggest, worst, most frustrating clutter quagmire in their lives – is photos.

    We promised you a podcast and a plan of attack, and our word was good (if a little bit, um, enthusiastic – listen above). With the help of organizational guru Alan Henry, Deputy Editor of Lifehacker, we've put together a customized step-by-step system to help you back up, sort, and organize your digital photo collection for the long haul. By then end of this process, you're going to be scrolling through your pictures and contemplating the role photos really play in our lives.

    But first, the time has come to get your photos in shape. Seriously. Now. It'll be more fun than you think. Mostly.

    The Note to Self System For Decluttering Your Photos and Coming to Terms With Your Mortality

    I. The Basic Tools
    II. Decide How Deep You Want to Go

    III. Tell Us What You Found (Part Two!)


    The Basic Tools

    According to Alan, these are the terms, tools, and basic tricks you'll need to get started – though how far you go with them is up to you. See: Deciding How Deep to Go.

    Back-up services: This is a centralized place on the cloud where you can get to the raw files of your photos if you need to. Alan recommends Dropbox, but iCloudGoogle DriveOneDrive or the like could serve a similar function, so long as you’re willing to pay for extra storage. One work-around: sign up for an extra account just for photo storage purposes.

    Auto-upload: You have two options with your back-up service. The first is turning on the auto-upload feature, which means you’ll be syncing the full-sized files to your computer. If you want to get these photos printed, use another service like Apple Photos or Picasa or Aperture, or plan to edit your photos with software such as Photoshop, this is a good idea. The other, more space-friendly option: leave that setting off, and instead be really judicious about how many of your photos you sync to your computer, or commit to going in and taking the ones you don’t want down. This is going to take some introspection, some cutting-of-your-losses, and also maybe some back-up hardware.

    Back-up hardware: An external hard drive that can hold all of the files you don’t want taking up space on your devices. It’s the digital version of flossing your teeth. In this case, pick whatever works for you – if you’ve got less than 64 gigabytes of files you care about, a solid USB could work. If you’ve got a lot more than that (or if you just want to keep your options open), you should spring for an external hard drive.

    Photo management services: This is the service you’ll use to help you categorize and sort through your pictures, whether that’s by date, location, or content. Alan’s favorite is Google Photos, which gives you unlimited space as long as your photos fall below a certain resolution (16 megapixels or 1080p HD video). You can set it so that Google will automatically reduce anything above that size to lower quality as well – for most people this should be just fine for organizing and digital-viewing purposes. From there, Google’s photo categorization technology will help you label and organize the photos into albums and galleries. You could also choose a social media platform like Facebook or Instagram, you just have to commit to making them more or less public.

    Facial recognition: A type of deep learning used by such services as Google Photos to categorize and organize your photos. This comes with some very real caveats.

    Scanner: The best way to collect all your old physical photos and store them with your digitla photos. Alan says you can go high tech and buy a picture scanner (he recommends the Doxie or the Doxie Go WiFi) to scan them at home, or send them out to get scanned. Or – if you’re OK with really low fidelity– you can just take a picture of the picture. Meta!

    Privacy/sharing settings: Be sure to double check that you’re only sharing what you want to share, no matter which services you choose. That said, Alan Henry says his rule is to only upload the images he is OK with his friends and family seeing. The only way to absolutely ensure privacy (well, as much as we can possibly absolutely ensure privacy), is to avoid using the cloud altogether.

    In Alan's words:
    "As for what to snap and what not to snap - well, I’m not of the mindset that 'if you don’t want it public you shouldn’t take it or store it on the Internet' – that blames *people* for problems with *technology.* However, it’s important to be mindful when you snap, and maybe take it into your own hands to choose what to upload and what not to, then back up or encrypt anything you want to save but don’t want out of your reach to delete at any time. :)"

    Decide How Deep You Want to Go

    Alan thinks we all fit into one of three photo-taking categories: casual snapshooters, moderate snapshooters, and enthusiastic snapshooters. Figuring out which category you belong to will help you decide how far you really need to go in your personal photo-decluttering process. 


    BUCKET 1: THE CASUAL SNAP SHOOTER

    Characteristics:

    • You have a bunch of photos all over the place, but you're not as concerned about organizing the past as you are setting up a solid system for the future.
    • You primarily take photos with your phone.
    • Your goal is to go from disorganized to organized, not necessarily to group all of your photos in the same place.

    Your steps:

    1. Pick a system for automatic back-up. Download the app if you don’t have it already. Turn on auto-upload.

    That’s it! Save your password somewhere safe. Invest in an external hard drive if you’re feeling really responsible. Digital hygiene, everybody.

    Be sure to tell us what you've found.


    BUCKET 2: THE MODERATE SNAP SHOOTER

    Characteristics: 

    • For the most part, your photos are already digital – just in a billion different places.
    • You may have a few old phones, some SD cards from a DSLR or other high-end digital camera, but you're not terribly concerned with really old physical photos.
    • You probably have hundreds (or maybe a couple thousand but no more than that) of photos you care about, and want them to be organized, both past and present.

    Your Steps: 

    1. Turn on auto upload for your back-up system of choice (i.e., Dropbox).
    2. Choose your photo management service, and transfer the photos you care about the most into it (i.e. Google Photos.).
    3. Start hunting down the rest of the digital photos you really care about and pull them into your photo management service. Be judicious: What's really worth    migrating off of, say, that Flickr account you started and never went back to? Which Facebook Photos do you want to make sure you're saving in higher quality? Did you have a SmugMug account you need to check?
    4. Once you've uploaded the photos you care about most into this central service, look through the albums it has created for you. See where the system has sorted it correctly, and where it has gotten details wrong. Take over as the human here, and start adjusting into a system that will be meaningful to you.
    • This can be as intense of a process as you choose, just be sure to label with names that will be memorable. (I.e., not “August 2015,” but “Trip to Paris With Family.”)
    • This system should recognize dates and location at the very least. If they’re wonky – and older photos probably will be – pick and choose which ones you care about correcting.
    • Starting to sort through your photos will also help you jog your memory about any meaningful pictures you may have forgotten. Track them down, rinse, repeat.

    BUCKET 3: THE ENTHUSIASTIC SNAP SHOOTER

    Characteristics: 

    • You have thousands of photos — probably more than Dropbox or Google Photos' drag-and-drop interfaces can handle in one go.
    • You use multiple devices, including cameras with SD cards and phones.
    • You’re looking for all of your memories to be organized, both past and present. You might even want to organize all of the photos from the whole family’s set of gadgets, like phones or tablets everyone uses.

    Your Steps:

    1. Pick a back-up system. Turn on auto-upload for your current and future photos. Let the current batch upload. This could take a few minutes.
    2. Once you’re done uploading, drag and drop as many of your already-digital but easily-accessible photos from your back-up system to your photo management system. For now, draw the line at your primary devices—the laptops or computers you already use, the phone you already use, and the SD card currently in your favorite camera you’ve been meaning to back up. Aim to get the majority of your current and most recent photos centralized.
    3. Once the bulk of your current photos are on your two services, spend some time getting in touch with your memories again, building galleries and doing searches through your most recent upload. Look through the albums your photo management service has created for you, and see where the system has sorted it correctly, and where it has gotten details wrong.
    4. Start sorting into albums that will be meaningful to you. This can be as intense of a process as you choose, just be sure to label with names that will be memorable. You’re also teaching the system which details actually matter to you.
    5. From here, start hunting down old photos to add to the collection. Then, batch by batch, pull in old folders. Then, as you have the time, energy, or desire to centralize those old photos, you can power up that old laptop and upload them, or dump them to an external hard drive and upload them in batches (all of your old 2003 trip photos at once, for example.) This way you’re making continual progress without committing yourself to a week-long wrestling match with the tendrils of Google and Dropbox every time you want to back-up your memories. 

    When you're as far as you're going to get for the moment... tell us what you've found!


    Where to Look For Old Photos

    If you're like most people, you've probably stored your photos in all kinds of different places over the years. Here's a not-at-allcomprehensive-but-hopefully-inspirational list of places to look:

    • Your phone's built-in photos app
    • Your old phone's built-in photos app
    • Photo apps on your laptop/PC Drive/ Desktop
    • Folders on your laptop/PC 
    • External harddrive
    • CDs/DVDs
    • USBs
    • Old cameras
    • Email
    • Text messages (these can take up a surprising amount of space!)
    • Facebook
    • Instagram
    • Picasa
    • PhotoBucket
    • SnapFish
    • ShutterFly
    • Flickr
    • DropBox
    • Google Drive
    • Google +
    • Box
    • Google Photo
    • iCloud 
    • Microsoft OneDrive
    • Image Shack
    • SmugMug
    • EverNote
    • ShoeBox
    • Imgur 

    Got more? Comment here, tell us on Twitter or Facebook, or email to notetoselfradio@wnyc.org. 

    Subscribe to Note to Self on iTunesStitcherTuneInI Heart Radio, or anywhere else using our RSS feed.


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    A woman with French flag painted on her face, holds a flower during a gathering in tribute to the victims of Paris attacks in Tbilisi, Georgia, November 14, 2015. REUTERS/David Mdzinarishvili - RTS70VZ

    A woman with French flag painted on her face, holds a flower during a gathering in tribute to the victims of Paris attacks in Tbilisi, Georgia on Nov. 14. Photo by David Mdzinarishvili/Reuters

    This photo taken on November 14, 2015 in Strasbourg, eastern France, shows a memorial of flowers and candles following a series of terrorist attacks resulting in the death of at least 120 people in Paris on November 13.Photo by Frederick Florin/AFP/Getty Images

    This photo taken on November 14, 2015 in Strasbourg, eastern France, shows a memorial of flowers and candles following a series of terrorist attacks in Paris on November 13. Photo by Frederick Florin/AFP/Getty Images

    Following several coordinated terror attacks in Paris Friday night, which left at least 129 people dead and more than 350 injured, signs of solidarity emerged from around the world.

    In Shanghai, the Oriental Pearl TV Tower shone Le Tricolor blue, white and red.

    People lit candles and lay flowers at the sites of the attacks — and at French embassies from Toulouse to Tehran — as security was stepped up globally.

    A postcard and flowers are left in tribute to victims of Paris attacks outside the French Embassy in London, Britain November 14, 2015. REUTERS/Suzanne Plunkett - RTS6Z8C

    A postcard and flowers are left in tribute to victims of Paris attacks outside the French Embassy in London, Britain November 14, 2015. REUTERS/Suzanne Plunkett – RTS6Z8C

    Candles and white roses are displayed on the French flag in  Toulouse on November 14, 2015 as a tribute to the victims of the attacks in Paris in which 128 people were killed.  Islamic State jihadists on Saturday claimed a series of coordinated attacks by gunmen and suicide bombers in Paris that killed at least 128 people in scenes of carnage at a concert hall, restaurants and the national stadium. Photo by Pascal Pavani/AFP/Getty Images

    Candles and white roses were displayed on the French flag in Toulouse on November 14, as a tribute to the victims. Photo by Pascal Pavani/AFP/Getty Images

    A youth lights a candle as people lay floral tributes at the "Belle Equipe" restaurant, the site of one of the attacks in Paris on November 14, 2015.  Photo by Lionel Bonaventure/AFP/Getty Images

    A young boy lit a candle as people lay floral tributes at the Belle Equipe restaurant, the site of one of the attacks in Paris on November 14, 2015. Photo by Lionel Bonaventure/AFP/Getty Images

    Parisians light candles and lay tributes on the monument at Place de la Republique, the day after deadly terrorist attacks on November 14, 2015 in Paris, France. Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

    Parisians lit candles and placed tributes on the monument at Place de la Republique, the day after deadly terrorist attacks on November 14, 2015 in Paris, France. Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

    Iranian people pay tribute to the victims of the attacks in Paris, outside the French embassy in Tehran on November 14, 2015. Photo by Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images

    Iranian people paid tribute to the victims of the attacks in Paris, outside the French embassy in Tehran on Nov. 14, 2015. Photo by Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images

    Flowers and a peace sign in the shape of the Parisian landmark the Eiffel Tower, are seen outside the French embassy in Minsk on November 14, 2015, a day after deadly attacks in Paris. Photo by Maxim Malinovsky/AFP/Getty Images

    Flowers and a peace sign in the shape of the Parisian landmark, the Eiffel Tower, were seen outside the French embassy in Minsk on November 14, 2015, a day after deadly attacks in Paris. Photo by Maxim Malinovsky/AFP/Getty Images

    A man shelters from the rain beneath a Union flag-themed umbrella as he photographs London's iconic Tower Bridge, illuminated in blue, white and red lights, resembling the colors of the French national flag, in London on November 14, 2015, as Britons express their solidarity with France following a spate of coordinated attacks that left 128 dead in Paris on November 13. Photo by Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images

    A man shelters from the rain beneath a Union flag-themed umbrella as he photographs London’s iconic Tower Bridge, illuminated in blue, white and red lights, resembling the colors of the French national flag, in London on November 14, 2015, as Britons express their solidarity with France following a spate of coordinated attacks that left 128 dead in Paris on November 13. Photo by Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images

    A woman holds signs at the harbor in Marseille, on November 14, 2015, the day after a total of six separate attacks, which killed at least 128 people in Paris, one targeting the national stadium where the French and German national football teams were playing a friendly.  Photo by    Anne-Christine Poujoulat/AFP/Getty Images

    A woman holds signs at the harbor in Marseille, on November 14, 2015, the day after a total of six separate attacks, which killed at least 128 people in Paris, one targeting the national stadium where the French and German national football teams were playing a match. Photo by Anne-Christine Poujoulat/AFP/Getty Images

    Hand-written messages lie among flowers and candles left by mourners at the gate of the French Embassy following the recent terror attacks in Paris on November 14, 2015 in Berlin, Germany. Hundreds of people came throughout the day to lay flowers, candles and messages of condolence to mourn the victims of attacks last night in Paris. Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images

    Hand-written messages lie among flowers and candles left by mourners at the gate of the French Embassy following the recent terror attacks in Paris on November 14, 2015 in Berlin, Germany. Hundreds of people came throughout the day to lay flowers, candles and messages of condolence to mourn the victims of attacks last night in Paris. Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images

    The Oriental Pearl TV Tower (L), in the Lujiazui Financial District in Pudong, is lit in red, white and blue, resembling the colors of the French flag, in Shanghai on November 14, 2015, as the Chinese expressed their solidarity with France following a spate of deadly coordinated attacks in Paris late on November 13. Photo by Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images

    The Oriental Pearl TV Tower (L), in the Lujiazui Financial District in Pudong, is lit in red, white and blue, resembling the colors of the French flag, in Shanghai on November 14, 2015, as the Chinese expressed their solidarity with France following a spate of deadly coordinated attacks in Paris late on November 13.

    People gather  in Piazza Fontana in Milan on November 14, 2015, a day after deadly attacks in Paris. Photo by Giuseppe Cacace/AFP/Getty Images

    People gather in Piazza Fontana in Milan on November 14, 2015, a day after deadly attacks in Paris. Photo by Giuseppe Cacace/AFP/Getty Images

    The post ‘Je suis Paris': In solidarity with France, tributes spring up across the globe appeared first on PBS NewsHour.


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    Crowds gather as candles are lit near the Bataclan theatre as France observes three days of national mourning on November 15, 2015 in Paris, France. Photo by Marc Piasecki/Getty Images

    Crowds gather as candles are lit near the Bataclan theatre as France observes three days of national mourning on November 15, 2015 in Paris, France. Photo by Marc Piasecki/Getty Images

    People lit candles, posted placards and paid tribute across France on Sunday in remembrance of the victims killed in the terror attacks that hit Paris on Friday night.

    Paris officials reported the death toll at 129, with more than 350 injured.

    At the famed Notre Dame Cathedral in the city’s fourth Arrondissement, thousands of mourners paid tribute to the victims as the church held a special service.

    Museums and other major attractions across the capital city remained closed for a second day.

    A flower is placed inside a bullet hole in the window of Le Carillon restaurant in tribute to the victims of the terror attacks on November 15, 2015 in Paris, France. As France observes three days of national mourning members of the public continue to pay tribute to the victims of Friday's deadly attacks. A special service for the families of the victims and survivors is to be held at Paris's Notre Dame Cathedral later on Sunday. Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

    A flower is placed inside a bullet hole in the window of Le Carillon restaurant in tribute to the victims of the terror attacks on November 15, 2015 in Paris, France. Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

    A woman sits by a poster which reads "Solidarity with Paris" in Nice, France, November 15, 2015, after a series of deadly shootings in Paris on Friday. Photo by Eric Gaillard/Reuters

    A woman sits by a poster which reads “Solidarity with Paris” in Nice, France, November 15, 2015, after a series of deadly shootings in Paris on Friday. Photo by Eric Gaillard/Reuters

    A man attaches a French flag to a statue at Place de la Republique near sites of the deadly attacks in Paris, November 15, 2015. Photo by   Pascal Rossignol/Reuters

    A man attaches a French flag to a statue at Place de la Republique near sites of the deadly attacks in Paris, November 15, 2015. Photo by Pascal Rossignol/Reuters

    People react as they view tributes and flowers outside La Belle Equipe restaurant on Rue de Charonne following Fridays terrorist attack and France observes three days of national mourning on November 15, 2015 in Paris, France. As France observes three days of national mourning members of the public continue to pay tribute to the victims of Friday's deadly attacks. A special service for the families of the victims and survivors is to be held at Paris's Notre Dame Cathedral later on Sunday. Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

    People react as they view tributes and flowers outside La Belle Equipe restaurant on Rue de Charonne following Fridays terrorist attack and France observes three days of national mourning on November 15, 2015 in Paris, France. Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

    The Archbishop of Paris, Andre Vingt-Trois says mass at the Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, France, November 15, 2015, in homage to the victims of a series of fatal shootings in the French capital on Friday. Photo by Lionel Bonaventure/Reuters

    The Archbishop of Paris, Andre Vingt-Trois says mass at the Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, France, November 15, 2015, in homage to the victims of a series of fatal shootings in the French capital on Friday. Photo by Lionel Bonaventure/Reuters

    People hold hands to form a human solidarity chain near the site of the attack at the Bataclan concert hall in Paris, November 15, 2015. Photo by Pascal Rossignol/Reuters

    People hold hands to form a human solidarity chain near the site of the attack at the Bataclan concert hall in Paris, November 15, 2015. Photo by Pascal Rossignol/Reuters

    Candles are lit near the 'Bataclan' theatre as France observes three days of national mourning on November 15, 2015 in Paris, France. As France observes three days of national mourning members of the public continue to pay tribute to the victims of Friday's deadly attacks. A special service for the families of the victims and survivors is to be held at Paris's Notre Dame Cathedral later on Sunday. Photo by Marc Piasecki/Getty Images

    Candles are lit near the ‘Bataclan’ theatre as France observes three days of national mourning on November 15, 2015 in Paris, France. As France observes three days of national mourning members of the public continue to pay tribute to the victims of Friday’s deadly attacks. A special service for the families of the victims and survivors is to be held at Paris’s Notre Dame Cathedral later on Sunday. Photo by Marc Piasecki/Getty Images

    A woman offers free hugs as people gather in Place de la Republique after the series deadly attacks in Paris, November 15, 2015. Photo by Christian Hartmann/Reuters

    A woman offers free hugs as people gather in Place de la Republique after the series deadly attacks in Paris, November 15, 2015. Photo by Christian Hartmann/Reuters

    Several hundred people, Muslims and non-Muslims, gather to pray at the Grande Mosque in Lyon, France, November 15, 2015, for the victims of the series of shootings in Paris on Friday. Photo by Robert Pratta/Reuters

    Several hundred people, Muslims and non-Muslims, gather to pray at the Grande Mosque in Lyon, France, November 15, 2015, for the victims of the series of shootings in Paris on Friday. Photo by Robert Pratta/Reuters

    People walk to the Notre Dame Cathedral ahead of a ceremony to the victims of the friday's terrorist attacks on November 15, 2015 in Paris, France. Photo by Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images

    People walk to the Notre Dame Cathedral ahead of a ceremony to the victims of the friday’s terrorist attacks on November 15, 2015 in Paris, France. Photo by Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images

    A candle is placed during a vigil in Place de la Republique following the series of deadly attacks in Paris, November 15, 2015.  Photo by Benoit Tessier /Reuters

    A candle is placed during a vigil in Place de la Republique following the series of deadly attacks in Paris, November 15, 2015. Photo by Benoit Tessier /Reuters

    The post Candles lit across France on second day of national mourning appeared first on PBS NewsHour.


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    People gather at Place de la Republique square to pay tribute to the victims of last year's shooting at the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, in Paris, France, January 10, 2016. France this week commemorates the victims of last year's Islamist militant attacks on satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo and a Jewish supermarket with eulogies, memorial plaques and another cartoon lampooning religion.  REUTERS/Charles Platiau       TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY      - RTX21R2F

    People gather at Place de la Republique square to pay tribute to the victims of last year’s shooting at the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, in Paris, France, January 10, 2016. Photo by Charles Platiau/Reuters

    Around 2,000 people gathered in Paris Sunday to remember the victims of all of the terror attacks that occurred last year in France, killing nearly 150 people.

    French Republican guards stand during a ceremony at Place de la Republique square to pay tribute to the victims of last year's shooting at the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, in Paris, France, January 10, 2016. France this week commemorates the victims of last year's Islamist militant attacks on satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo and a Jewish supermarket with eulogies, memorial plaques and another cartoon lampooning religion.  REUTERS/Yohan Valat/Pool      TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY      - RTX21Q9Z

    French Republican guards stand during a ceremony at Place de la Republique square to pay tribute to the victims of last year’s shooting at the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, in Paris, France, January 10, 2016. Photo by Yohan Valat/Pool/Reuters

    President Francois Hollande and Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo were among those who paid tribute at a ceremony held in the French capital’s Place de la République.

    Last week marked one year since Islamic extremists killed 16 people in the offices of the satirical magazine “Charlie Hebdo” and in a Kosher market.

    French President Francois Hollande (C), Prime Minister Manuel Valls (R) and Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo (L) attend a ceremony at Place de la Republique square to pay tribute to the victims of last year's shooting at the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, in Paris, France, January 10, 2016. France this week commemorates the victims of last year's Islamist militant attacks on satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo and a Jewish supermarket with eulogies, memorial plaques and another cartoon lampooning religion.  REUTERS/Charles Platiau      TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY      - RTX21Q70

    French President Francois Hollande (C), Prime Minister Manuel Valls (R) and Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo (L) attend a ceremony at Place de la Republique square to pay tribute to the victims of last year’s shooting at the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, in Paris, France, January 10, 2016. Photo by Charles Platiau/Reuters

    A person holds up a "Je Suis Charlie" (I am Charlie) sign during a ceremony at Place de la Republique square to pay tribute to the victims of last year's shooting at the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, in Paris, France, January 10, 2016. France this week commemorates the victims of last year's Islamist militant attacks on satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo and a Jewish supermarket with eulogies, memorial plaques and another cartoon lampooning religion.  REUTERS/Yoan Valat/Pool - RTX21QA0

    A person holds up a “Je Suis Charlie” (I am Charlie) sign during a ceremony at Place de la Republique square to pay tribute to the victims of last year’s shooting at the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, in Paris, France, January 10, 2016. Photo by Yoan Valat/Pool/Reuters

    On Nov. 13, armed militants affiliated with the Islamic extremist group that calls itself the Islamic State killed 130 people in attacks on Paris cafes and a concert hall.

    PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 10:  The statue in the Place de la Republique is lit in tribute to victims of last years terrorist attacks in France on January 10, 2016 in Paris, France. France honors today the victims killed in extremist attacks in Paris in 2015.  (Photo by Thierry Chesnot/Getty Images)

    The statue in the Place de la Republique is lit in tribute to victims of last years terrorist attacks in France on January 10, 2016 in Paris, France. France honors today the victims killed in extremist attacks in Paris in 2015. Photo by Thierry Chesnot/Getty Images

    One suspect directly involved in the November attack remains at large.

    The post Paris remembers victims of 2015 terror attacks appeared first on PBS NewsHour.


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    Brazilian model Sabrina Sato parades for Gavioes da Fiel samba school during carnival in Sao Paulo, Brazil, February 6, 2016. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker - RTX25P71

    Brazilian model Sabrina Sato parades for Gavioes da Fiel samba school during carnival in Sao Paulo, Brazil, February 6, 2016. Photo by Paulo Whitaker/Reuters

    Even as widespread fears of the Zika virus hang heavy over Brazil–the world’s worst affected country–the annual Carnival festival was in full swing over the weekend as revelers kept the spirited tradition alive. 

    The festival, which began on Friday and lasts through Wednesday, involves five days of parades and street parties, bringing together millions of partygoers.

    “What’s interesting about Carnival is that at the very core the philosophy is, forget your troubles and party like there is no tomorrow,” NewsHour Science Correspondent Miles O’Brien said from Recife, Brazil on Friday.“That’s how the Brazilians view it and that’s why in most cases the party has gone on.”

    Officials say as many as 100,000 people may have been exposed to the virus in the city of Recife, which has become known as the epicenter of the Zika outbreak, although symptoms are often mild or undetectable.

    “I talked to a lot of public health officials and doctors and scientists who have been involved in this hunt for some action and some way to control the Zika outbreak, and many of them express misgivings about it, frankly, but the show is going on,” O’Brien said.

    OLINDA, BRAZIL - FEBRUARY 06: Dancers are blurred in a long exposure during Carnival celebrations on February 6, 2016 in Olinda, Pernambuco state, Brazil. Revellers in Olinda and sister city Recife are gathering for various concerts and street parades during Carnival in spite of fears over the Zika virus. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

    Dancers are blurred in a long exposure during Carnival celebrations on February 6, 2016 in Olinda, Pernambuco state, Brazil. Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images

    RECIFE, BRAZIL - FEBRUARY 06:  Revellers gather during the Galinho da Madrugada 'bloco', or street parade, during Carnival celebrations on February 6, 2016 in Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil. Officials say as many as 100,000 people may have already been exposed to the Zika virus in Recife, which is being called the epicenter of the Zika outbreak, although most people never develop symptoms.  (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

    Revellers gather during the Galinho da Madrugada ‘bloco’, or street parade, during Carnival celebrations on February 6, 2016 in Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil. Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images

    Revellers parade for Vila Maria samba school during carnival in Sao Paulo, Brazil, February 6, 2016. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker - RTX25OV6

    Revellers parade for Vila Maria samba school during Carnival in Sao Paulo, Brazil, February 6, 2016. Photo by Paulo Whitaker/Reuters

    OLINDA, BRAZIL - FEBRUARY 06: A reveller stands beneath a mosquito net, as a satirical costume, during Carnival celebrations on February 6, 2016 in Olinda, Pernambuco state, Brazil. Revellers in Olinda and sister city Recife are gathering for various concerts and street parades during Carnival in spite of fears over the Zika virus. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

    A reveller stands beneath a mosquito net, as a satirical costume, during Carnival celebrations on February 6, 2016 in Olinda, Pernambuco state, Brazil. Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images

    Henrique kisses his wife Paula, who is seven months pregnant, during an annual block party known as "Eu Acho e pouco" (I think it is little) one of the many carnival parties to take place in the neighbourhoods of Olinda, Brazil February 6, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino - RTX25SOG

    Henrique kisses his wife Paula, who is seven months pregnant, during an annual block party known as “Eu Acho e pouco” (I think it is little) one of the many carnival parties to take place in the neighbourhoods of Olinda, Brazil February 6, 2016. Photo by Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters

    A reveller from the Rocinha samba school dances as she takes part in the Group A category of the annual Carnival parade in Rio de Janeiro's Sambadrome, Brazil, February 5, 2016.  REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes - RTX25OGS

    A reveller from the Rocinha samba school dances as she takes part in the Group A category of the annual Carnival parade in Rio de Janeiro’s Sambadrome, Brazil, February 5, 2016. Photo by Ricardo Moraes/Reuters

    The post Photos: Brazil’s Carnival in full swing despite widespread Zika threat appeared first on PBS NewsHour.


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    Performers take a part in a re-enactment of an ancient Qing Dynasty ceremony as the Lunar New Year of the Monkey is celebrated at Ditan Park (the Temple of Earth) in Beijing, China on Feb. 8. Photo by Damir Sagolj/Reuters

    Performers take a part in a re-enactment of an ancient Qing Dynasty ceremony as the Lunar New Year of the Monkey is celebrated at Ditan Park (the Temple of Earth) in Beijing, China on Feb. 8. Photo by Damir Sagolj/Reuters

    With fireworks crackling and incense burning, families celebrated the Chinese Lunar New Year on Monday by eating, dancing and cleaning house.

    One of the customs of the New Year is to sweep away misfortune and make way for good luck. Revelers also decorated their windows and doors with intricate paper cut-outs and gave money as gifts.

    Luckily, there was no confusion this year as to the kind of animal celebrated.

    Traditional dancers perform the lion dance during the opening ceremony in Ditan Park at the beginning of Chinese Lunar New Year in Beijing, China on Feb. 8. Photo by Stringer/Reuters

    Traditional dancers perform the lion dance during the opening ceremony in Ditan Park in Beijing, China’s capital. Photo by Stringer/Reuters

    A man plays an instrument at a fair in the beginning of Chinese Lunar New Year at Huangsi Temple in Shenyang, Liaoning province, China on Feb. 8. Photo by Sheng Li/Reuters

    A man plays an intricate instrument at a Lunar New Year’s celebration at Huangsi Temple in Shenyang, Liaoning province, China. Photo by Sheng Li/Reuters

    Performers dance in costume at the beginning of Chinese Lunar New Year celebrations at Huangsi Temple in Shenyang, Liaoning province, China on Feb. 8. Photo by Sheng Li/Reuters

    Performers dance in the traditional color of red at Huangsi Temple in Shenyang, China. Photo by Sheng Li/Reuters

    A young performer dressed as a monkey attends a parade celebrating the first day of the Lunar New Year of the Monkey in Hong Kong, China on Feb. 8. Photo by Bobby Yip/Reuters

    A young performer is dressed as a monkey for China’s first day of the Lunar New Year in Hong Kong on Feb. 8. Photo by Bobby Yip/Reuters

    Dancers from the Shin Kotoni Tenburyujin in Japan take part in a parade in Hong Kong, China on Feb. 8 to celebrate the first day of the Lunar New Year of the Monkey. Photo by Bobby Yip/Reuters

    Dancers from the Shin Kotoni Tenburyujin in Japan take part in a parade in Hong Kong. Photo by Bobby Yip/Reuters

    A lion dance is performed during a parade celebrating the first day of the Lunar New Year of the Monkey in Hong Kong, China on Feb. 8. Photo by Bobby Yip/Reuters

    A lion dance marks the beginning of the Chinese New Year. Photo by Bobby Yip/Reuters

    People burn incense as they pray for good fortune at the beginning of the first day of Chinese Lunar New Year at Yuanmiaoguan temple in Huizhou, Guangdong province on Feb. 8. Photo by Stringer/Reuters

    Burning incense is a New Year’s tradition at Yuanmiaoguan temple in Huizhou, Guangdong province. Photo by Stringer/Reuters

    <>

    The post Photos: China welcomes the Year of the Monkey appeared first on PBS NewsHour.


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    Pallbearers carry the casket down the aisle at the start of the funeral Mass for Associate Justice Antonin Scalia at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington, February 20, 2016.  REUTERS/Doug Mills/Pool via Reuters - RTX27TOH

    Pallbearers carry the casket down the aisle at the start of the funeral Mass for Associate Justice Antonin Scalia at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington, February 20, 2016. Photo by Doug Mills/Reuters

    Thousands of mourners paid their respects in Washington D.C. on Saturday to remember the late U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia who died last week.

    The Rev. Paul Scalia, the late Justice’s son, led the mass at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception. The late Justice’s four other sons were pallbearers for the casket.

    “He loved the clarity and coherence of the church’s teachings,” Rev. Scalia said. “He treasured the church’s ceremonies, especially the beauty of her ancient worship; the power of her sacraments as the means of salvation.”

    WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 20:  Father Paul Scalia, son of Justice Antonin Scalia, center,  leads the funeral Mass for Associate Justice Antonin Scalia at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception February 20, 2016 in Washington, DC.  Scalia, who died February 13 while on a hunting trip in Texas, layed in repose in the Great Hall of the Supreme Court on Friday and his funeral service will be at the basillica today.   (Photo by  Doug Mills-Pool/Getty Images)

    Father Paul Scalia, son of Justice Antonin Scalia, center, leads the funeral Mass for Associate Justice Antonin Scalia at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception February 20, 2016 in Washington, DC. Photo by Doug Mills/Getty Images.

    WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 20:  Former Vice President Dick Cheney, left, and Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas take their seats for funeral Mass for Associate Justice Antonin Scalia inside the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception February 20, 2016 in Washington, DC.  Scalia, who died February 13 while on a hunting trip in Texas, layed in repose in the Great Hall of the Supreme Court on Friday and his funeral service will be at the basillica today.   (Photo by  Doug Mills-Pool/Getty Images)

    Former Vice President Dick Cheney, left, and Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas take their seats for funeral Mass for Associate Justice Antonin Scalia inside the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception February 20, 2016 in Washington, DC. Photo by Doug Mills/Getty Images

    WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 20:  The cross is lead out of the funeral Mass for Associate Justice Antonin Scalia at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception February 20, 2016 in Washington, DC.  Scalia, who died February 13 while on a hunting trip in Texas, layed in repose in the Great Hall of the Supreme Court on Friday and his funeral service will be at the basillica today.   (Photo by  Doug Mills-Pool/Getty Images)

    The cross is lead out of the funeral Mass for Associate Justice Antonin Scalia at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception February 20, 2016 in Washington, DC. Photo by Doug Mills/Getty Images

    Father Paul Scalia (top, C), son of Associate Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, leads the funeral Mass for his father at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington, February 20, 2016.  REUTERS/Doug Mills/Pool via Reuters - RTX27U2D

    Father Paul Scalia (top, C), son of Associate Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, leads the funeral Mass for his father. Photo by Doug Mills/Reuters

    Pallbearers carry the casket of U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Antonin Scalia into his funeral mass at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington, February 20, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Theiler - RTX27TJC

    Pallbearers carry the casket of U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Antonin Scalia into his funeral mass. Photo by Mike Theiler/Reuters

    WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 20:  U.S. Supreme Court Police pallbearers carry Associate Justice Antonin Scalia's flag-covered casket between rows of Catholic clergy and out of the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception following his funeral February 20, 2016 in Washington, DC. Scalia, who died February 13 while on a hunting trip in Texas, layed in repose in the Great Hall of the Supreme Court on Friday and his funeral service will be at the basillica today.  (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

    U.S. Supreme Court Police pallbearers carry Associate Justice Antonin Scalia’s flag-covered casket between rows of Catholic clergy and out of the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception following his funeral February 20, 2016 in Washington, DC. Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

    WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 20:  U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Elena Kagan (L) leaves the the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception after attending fellow Associate Justice Antonin Scalia's funeral February 20, 2016 in Washington, DC. Scalia, who died February 13 while on a hunting trip in Texas, layed in repose in the Great Hall of the Supreme Court on Friday and his funeral service will be at the basillica today.  (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

    U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Elena Kagan (L) leaves the the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception after attending fellow Associate Justice Antonin Scalia’s funeral February 20, 2016 in Washington, DC. Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

    Scalia, appointed by President Ronald Reagan in 1986, served on the court for roughly 30 years as a powerful representative of the nation’s conservative wing. He was the court’s longest-serving justice.

    His death means the judicial branch loses its conservative majority, creating a vacancy that has sparked intense debate among presidential candidates and political officials concerned with who will replace him.

    Scalia died while on a hunting trip in Texas on Feb. 13.

    The post Photos: Thousands pay respects to late Justice Scalia at D.C. funeral mass appeared first on PBS NewsHour.


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    From church services to pastel eggs — Easter traditions of both a religious and secular nature were well on display across the globe on Sunday.

    Although customs vary widely from country to country, for the world’s more than 2 billion Christians, Easter is primarily a celebration of the resurrection of Jesus. The holiday is also called Resurrection Day.

    Easter is one of the busiest days of the year for many churches where attendance of those donning their “Sunday best” typically doubles.

    Here’s a look at what’s going on around the world on Easter Sunday.

    Pope Francis delivers the Urbi et Orbi benediction at the end of the Easter Mass in Saint Peter's Square at the Vatican March 27, 2016.  REUTERS/Osservatore Romano/Handout via Reuters     ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS PICTURE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. REUTERS IS UNABLE TO INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THE AUTHENTICITY, CONTENT, LOCATION OR DATE OF THIS IMAGE. EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. NO RESALES. NO ARCHIVE. THIS PICTURE IS DISTRIBUTED EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS. - RTSCEHM

    Pope Francis delivers the Urbi et Orbi benediction at the end of the Easter Mass in Saint Peter’s Square at the Vatican March 27, 2016. Photo by Reuters

    People on Fifth Avenue during the annual Easter Parade and Easter Bonnet Festival March 27, 2016 in New York.   The Easter Parade is a New York tradition that dates back to the middle of the 1800s. The social elite would attend services at one of the 5th Avenue churches and parade their new fashions down the Avenue afterwards. The flamboyant headgear and costumes are paraded down the Avenue to the delight of onlookers.  / AFP / Timothy A. CLARY        (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)

    People on Fifth Avenue during the annual Easter Parade and Easter Bonnet Festival March 27, 2016 in New York. Photo by Timothy A Clary/Getty Images

    Mexicans burn an effigy of U.S. Republican presidential hopeful Donald Trump as they celebrate an Easter ritual late on Saturday in Mexico City's poor La Merced neighborhood March 26, 2016. REUTERS/Henry Romero - RTSCDM6

    Mexicans burn an effigy of U.S. Republican presidential hopeful Donald Trump as they celebrate an Easter ritual late on Saturday in Mexico City’s poor La Merced neighborhood March 26, 2016. Photo by Henry Romero/Reuters

    Men fight during a Pinge wrestling competition in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, March 26, 2016. The event is held during Easter in Haiti.  REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares - RTSCD9K

    Men fight during a Pinge wrestling competition in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, March 26, 2016. The event is held during Easter in Haiti. Photo by Andres Martinez Casares/Reuters

    A military flyby passes over O'Connell Street during the commemoration of the 100 year anniversary of the Irish Easter Rising in Dublin, Ireland, March 27, 2016.  REUTERS/Clodagh Kilcoyne  TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY - RTSCEG2

    A military flyby passes over O’Connell Street during the commemoration of the 100 year anniversary of the Irish Easter Rising in Dublin, Ireland, March 27, 2016. Photo by Clodagh Kilcoyne

    Penitents take part in the procession of "La Soledad" brotherhood during Holy Week in Puerta del Sol Square in Madrid, Spain, March 26, 2016. REUTERS/Andrea Comas - RTSCD29

    Penitents take part in the procession of “La Soledad” brotherhood during Holy Week in Puerta del Sol Square in Madrid, Spain, March 26, 2016. Photo by Andrea Comas

    Two white lions cub play before opening a wrapped package on Easter at the zoo in La Fleche, northwestern France, on march 27, 2016. / AFP / JEAN-FRANCOIS MONIER        (Photo credit should read JEAN-FRANCOIS MONIER/AFP/Getty Images)

    Two white lions cub play before opening a wrapped package on Easter at the zoo in La Fleche, northwestern France, on march 27, 2016. /Photo by Jean-Francois Monier/Getty Images

    Easter eggs adorned in traditional Sorbian style are seen in Schleife, about 160 kilometers (99.4 miles) south-east of Berlin, Germany, March 27, 2016. A tiny Slavic minority in Germany is keeping alive a long and intricate tradition of hand-painting Easter eggs with the help of feathers and wax. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke  - RTSCE4J

    Easter eggs adorned in traditional Sorbian style are seen in Schleife, Germany, March 27, 2016. A tiny Slavic minority in Germany is keeping alive a long and intricate tradition of hand-painting Easter eggs with the help of feathers and wax. Photo by Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters

    A boy lights a candle with his father during Easter Sunday mass at the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem's Old City March 27, 2016. REUTERS/Amir Cohen  - RTSCE8U

    A boy lights a candle with his father during Easter Sunday mass at the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem’s Old City March 27, 2016. Photo by Amir Cohen

    A Spanish member of the United Nations Interim Forces (UNIFIL) breaks his egg with a Lebanese boy after an Easter service in Marjayoun village, southern Lebanon March 27, 2016. REUTERS/Karamallah Daher  - RTSCE71

    A Spanish member of the United Nations Interim Forces (UNIFIL) breaks his egg with a Lebanese boy after an Easter service in Marjayoun village, southern Lebanon March 27, 2016. Photo by Karamallah Daher/Reuters

    Believers attend a service at a Roman Catholic church on the eve of Easter Sunday in Krasnoyarsk, Siberia, Russia, March 26, 2016. Picture taken March 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin - RTSCDSG

    Believers attend a service at a Roman Catholic church on the eve of Easter Sunday in Krasnoyarsk, Siberia, Russia, March 26, 2016. Photo by Ilya Naymushin/Reuters

    The post From Fifth Avenue to the Vatican, celebrating Easter around the globe appeared first on PBS NewsHour.


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    In his new memoir, You Gotta Get Bigger Dreams: My Life in Stories and Pictures, award-winning Scottish actor Alan Cumming, gives a vividly illustrated account of his life in show business. From his tales of backstage friendships, to his late-night haunts and hangouts, to heartfelt stories of his dog, Honey, Cumming provides a window on what it is like to be Alan Cumming. 

     

     

     

     


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  • 11/01/16--07:57: The Life of a Shepherd
  • James Rebanks runs a family-owned farm in the Lake District in Northern England and also serves as an expert advisor to UNESCO on sustainable tourism. He also runs the popular Herdwick Shepherd account on Twitter (@herdyshepherd1). He joins us to discuss his second book, The Shepherd’s View: Modern Photographs From an Ancient Landscape, a collection of photography that chronicles the timeless rhythm of farm life in the Lake District.

    Event: On Tuesday, November 1 at 7 p.m. James Rebanks will be appearing at House of Speakeasy's "Seriously Entertaining Razor's Edge" at Joe's Pub (425 Lafayette Street) alongside Phil Klay, Elizabeth Alexander and Madeline Thien. 

     


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    Martha Karsh joins us to discuss The Beatles A Hard Day’s Night: A Private Archive, a new collection of previously unreleased publicity photos from The Beatles’ 1964 film, “A Hard Day’s Night.” In 2001, Martha Karsh and her husband, Bruce, bought the rights to behind-the-scenes images from the making of the film from the film’s producer. The book, edited by Martha, containing hundreds of the candid images, was planned as a surprise 60th birthday present to Bruce.


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    Watch Video

    WILLIAM BRANGHAM: Next: the rapid rise of one of the world’s biggest social media networks, Instagram.

    It’s building up steam, with 700 million people now using it each month, and it just took four months to pick up its latest 100 million new accounts.

    But along the way, the company has faced concerns over how it can be used, and even some criticism for the way it essentially copied ideas from its rival, Snapchat.

    Judy Woodruff recently got an inside look during her trip to Silicon Valley.

    JUDY WOODRUFF: One of the first things that greets you inside Instagram is, no surprise, a place to take pictures. The free photo-sharing mobile app was born in 2010 with its first post, a foot in a flip-flop alongside a stray dog.

    Turns out it was taken in Mexico by co-founder Kevin Systrom.

    KEVIN SYSTROM, CEO and Co-Founder, Instagram: It’s a mixture of teams. So, we have got design teams, we have got partnership teams, we have got a community team, and then a bunch of engineers. We don’t really have an organization.

    JUDY WOODRUFF: Systrom showed us around Instagram’s new offices in Menlo Park, California, designed to accommodate an ever-expanding staff.

    You moved here six months ago; is that right?

    KEVIN SYSTROM: Yes, six months ago, we moved from the original campus. And we designed this entire experience inside here to be cleaner, and a little bit more Instagrammy. So we have got the hip wood walls, and the polished concrete floors. It’s very start-uppy, but it’s in an Instagram way.

    JUDY WOODRUFF: A start-up no longer, Instagram was acquired by Facebook in 2012 for a cool billion dollars. Then, the company had 13 employees. Now it has more than 600 to keep up with a rapidly growing user base, 700 million monthly active users and counting, 80 percent of them outside the United States.

    How do you explain the phenomenal, rapid growth of this?

    KEVIN SYSTROM: On Instagram, very early on, you would post an image, and anyone anywhere in the world could see that image, and understand what you were trying to say without speaking your language.

    So, we like to say that Instagram was one of the first truly international networks in the world. And I think that’s what’s allowed it to scale to the hundreds of millions of people that use it every day today.

    JUDY WOODRUFF: It still is a pretty extraordinary growth rate, isn’t it?

    KEVIN SYSTROM: Yes.

    JUDY WOODRUFF: I mean, even with that rational explanation, it’s hard for people to understand how it happened.

    KEVIN SYSTROM: Yes. You know, back in the day, if you started a company, you would have to rent a warehouse, you would have to hire a bunch of employees. But, you know, with very, very few people sitting here in this building today, we’re able to scale it to hundreds of millions of people around the world, because of the innovations that we are built up upon.

    And that’s the cool thing about running a company today, is how many people you can touch how quickly.

    JUDY WOODRUFF: For a company founded on images, the walls here are adorned with some of the best, culled from Instagram users around the world.

    KEVIN SYSTROM: Well, not to invoke the common saying, but a picture is worth 1,000 words. And that’s kind of like the phrase that this company is built on. It’s just something that’s unlike traditional texts and traditional media. And I think it allows you to see a different side of people, maybe a more raw and human emotional side of people.

    JUDY WOODRUFF: Celebrities have embraced the app. Singer Selena Gomez has the most followers, more than 118 million. And Beyonce has the distinction of having the most-liked image in the history of Instagram, 10.9 million and climbing, for this photo that announced she’s pregnant with twins.

    For teens, the quest for more and more likes and followers, plus the pressure for perfection as portrayed by some mega-popular users, is raising concerns among parents. Not only body image, but also bullying have become issues for some younger users.

    And Instagram is grappling with how to foster a safe community, free from abusive behavior.

    So, when you started Instagram seven years ago in 2010, did you have any idea you were going to be spending time, a lot of time now, thinking about protecting the people who use it?

    KEVIN SYSTROM: No, I would say, every day at Instagram is not only the most complicated day of my career, but also the most interesting.

    JUDY WOODRUFF: How do you prepare yourself for this kind of responsibility? I mean, what are you, 32 years old?

    KEVIN SYSTROM: Thirty-three.

    JUDY WOODRUFF: Thirty-three.

    KEVIN SYSTROM: Yes.

    JUDY WOODRUFF: All of 33.

    That’s a lot of responsibility, isn’t it?

    KEVIN SYSTROM: Yes.

    And there are a lot of parents here at Instagram who think deeply about a world in which their children are going to grow up online, and what kind of product they want to create, and what kind of legacy they want to leave.

    I don’t yet have kids, but in a world where I do have kids, I want to make sure that the world they grow up in is one that is safe online, and that Instagram led the way to create that world.

    JUDY WOODRUFF: But with 95 million uploads a day, monitoring is a tall order. New guidelines are aimed at blurring out questionable material before the user even sees it, with a screen labeled “sensitive content.”

    There’s also a reporting function for content about self-harm or suicide. Systrom says the company’s work is far from over.

    KEVIN SYSTROM: This is a constant process. This is about making sure that we continue to evolve the way we attack the problem. This isn’t about getting to an eventual future where it is absolutely gone.

    That being said, it doesn’t mean that we can’t make real progress on it, and, more importantly, show the leadership that I think our company can and should, so that other tech companies do as well.

    JUDY WOODRUFF: The pressure in Silicon Valley to lead, innovate and stay relevant is intense. And Instagram has come under criticism for its outright and successful copying of rival Snapchat’s video stories feature

    Instagram Stories, you have openly said was copied, in effect, from Snapchat. Is that what happened?

    KEVIN SYSTROM: The way things work in Silicon Valley is that companies will think up ideas, and, if they’re good, they will stick. And, often, they spread to other companies. And if we can learn from other companies that do it really well, we’re going to continue to do that.

    JUDY WOODRUFF: Advertising on the app is also growing and reaping rewards. There are one million active advertisers, a 400 percent increase from last year.

    How have you changed your advertising philosophy over time?

    KEVIN SYSTROM: Yes, there were two major changes, I think, to our advertising philosophy over time. The first was just to have advertising at all.

    JUDY WOODRUFF: Period.

    KEVIN SYSTROM: That was a big one. But we always knew we were going to be a business, and that’s how we were going to be a business, was advertising.

    The second shift was going from a world where we had a small number of advertisers doing very refined ads to now, where we have many, many millions of advertisers on Facebook able to buy Instagram ads.

    JUDY WOODRUFF: We ended where we began, in front of Instagram’s wall of photo-ops, where Systrom shares credit for how far the company has come.

    KEVIN SYSTROM: It was the right time, it was the right idea, and then it was the right team. You need a lot of things to go well to get to this point. So I feel very lucky.

    WILLIAM BRANGHAM: The business practices and decisions made by Instagram and, much more broadly, by Facebook are increasingly under scrutiny. We will have a closer look at that issue later this week.

    The post How Instagram pictures the world appeared first on PBS NewsHour.


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  • 05/26/17--14:29: Too Much Information
  • After last Monday's bombing in Manchester, the New York Times published leaked photos of crime scene photos from the attack -- much to the chagrin of British officials, who said the publication could impede their investigation. Brooke questions the paper's decision and considers how the rush to print leaks might lead to unintended consequences.

    Song:

    The Hammer of Los by John Zorn


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    Click on the 'Listen' button above to hear this interview. 

    In our modern world, cameras are everywhere, but take a trip back to the not-so-distant past, and you'll see a reality that is very different.

    Portland photographer Kati Dimoff loves old cameras, and like all good photographers, she has a patient eye for detail. She often finds old cameras at second hand stores and the Goodwill, and sometimes inside, like shells from some beach-head of time, they contain hidden treasures: Undeveloped film.

    Once developed, this old film yields images, secrets, and moments. Just this year, she found a camera that contained undeveloped photos of the giant Mount St. Helens eruption, which took place 37 years ago. 

    Here, Dimoff discusses her work, and the photos she found (images below). 

      


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    Click on the 'Listen' button above to hear this segment. 

    From Army captains who are coming back from battle, to transgender people on the brink of transitioning, finding hope can be as simple as telling your story through photographs. 

    Drew Faithful, a transgender male and a sexual abuse survivor (pictured below), received a camera before he medically transitioned to help people understand his experience. He's a participant in the "Hope Is Project," in which each person receives a camera with one instruction: To photograph their vision of hope.

    It's the vision of Sarah Takako Skinner, who came up with the project after reflecting on how hope has shaped her own life. 

    Together, they weigh in on this new project, and what they hope to achieve. 

     


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  • 03/11/13--08:35: A (Digital) History of Us?
  • You’d think that documenting our footprints in digital world would be easy, in fact, a little too easy because people do it all the time. But, after having a short discussion with a co-worker at a library-museum in Kentucky (my old part-time job) he planted this small seed of fear in me about the future of archiving for the digital generation:

    If everyday people don’t keep journals or diaries anymore or write letters, what are people going to submit to their local museums when grandparents of the digital generation pass away? Will they have to dig through five different e-mail accounts to find love letters? Or rummage through GoogleDocs to track the ideas and conversations that have passed between innovators?  

    But then I came across this video and felt a little relieved:

    Vimeo

    Maybe technology will cause handwritten cursive letters to become obsolete and journals found in your grandparents attic will be harder to find, but maybe it’ll ignite everyday people to pursue personal projects where you can hear their voice and see their face.


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